25 thoughts on “Origami Boat Building – Welding the Hull Plate

  1. in order to arrange the plates in the height we take a piece of flat and
    haul of a rectangle in the corner
    we weld them vertically on the plate 90 ° in relation to the weld at the
    lower plate and strike a wedge between top plate and vertical plate
    welded (in the gutted rectangle) and arrange it so very easy.
    thanks for the effort and great documentation

  2. With the wind being an issue, why not just use SMAW? It wouldn’t give you
    the nicest looking welds around but it would certainly do the trick as far
    as penetration goes.

  3. I, too, dream of constructing my own boat someday. I wish to sail it across
    the world. Thank you for the videos :)

  4. Toward the beginning of the video you show prying the plate up with screw
    drivers to get it tight to the angle stiffner. A lil trick I use is if you
    have an old C clamp you can cut the top finger off of it so you can then
    tack it to plate near the angle do you can screw it against the angle to
    lift the plate tight. 

  5. Newport news shipyard uses a ‘dog” and wedge to fair up plate edges. The
    dog is a 1/4 thick rectangular plate about 2 x 4 inches with one corner cut
    out to form an L-shaped dog where the wedge will slide under. You tack weld
    the back side edge to the low plate with the L-shaped end overhanging the
    high plate and use the wedge lift the low plate until it’s flush. The top
    flat edge (4 inch side) of another dog works great for sliding it across
    the butt to ensure it’s flush. When done,knock them off with a hammer and
    resue.

  6. hey good for you. i like it when people follow there dreams, and at least
    give it a go. mate u have a ton of welding to do, maybe flux core is the
    go. is there any warp-age after welding? i am a boilermaker, sometimes when
    we flush align plates we use a “dog and wedge” but its quicker to weld to
    the side of the dog, a 5/8 nut .and use the bolt for height adjustment,
    instead of the wedge.

  7. Life is about doing what makes you happy. I find it really odd that some
    people feel the need to try and shoot down other peoples ideas and dreams.
    Go for it and enjoy what you do. Glad to see that the detractors don’t
    disturb you.

  8. I applaud your belief in the possible. I recall decades ago a family who
    built a concrete sailing vessel in northern Illinois. They were chided,
    laughed at, but it all changed when they put the hull upright and began
    outfitting the interior. I’ll watch for you as you pass by the North
    Carolina coastline. Joe

  9. cool! Thx for the quick reply. Do you guys have a dxf of the final boat you
    would mind sharing? I would like to make a mini version for the kids (3
    feet long probably)

  10. That’s a great idea. There is a free sample on our web site for a single
    chine hull. Go to: SVSeeker (dot) com, under Sailboat / Origami Hull. Sorry
    I can’t give out the lines for our hull. Jack Carson drew those and when
    you buy something like that you only buy the permission to use them for
    your boat.

  11. So is this something you work on during the weekends? What do you do for
    full time work? Just curious. Very cool project.

  12. Did’nt know that. And he did it without GPS or a weather FAX. Actually my
    neighbors are all laborers and they don’t seem to doubt it at all. The
    folks in my corporate office are another matter. I don’t think they believe
    anything can be done without a project planner and contracted consultants.
    🙂

  13. LOL. Thanks Keith. Kay and I when to a marriage counselor before we got
    married and the advice was DONT! That was the best advice I ever ignored. 🙂

  14. I MIG almost everything. The only time I use stick is when I need move
    around a lot, or just do a few short welds. It’s especially handy when I
    need to add something to the top of the gantry crane. Basically, I suck at
    stick, but mostly because I rarely use it. And I hate changing the stick
    all the time. MIG rocks for high productivity.

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